Mechanical becomes electronic

Brains behind the lock

The Simplex 1000 is the most common push-button mechanical lockset you will find on commercial buildings. The primary draw to keyless locks is that they are keyless. There are no keys to issue and no keys to re-issue when the lock is changed. A limitation of the mechanical push-button locks is that only one code can be used at a time, which means everyone shares the same code. The only way you can lock out one person who knew the code is to change the code for everyone. Other limitations of mechanical push-button locks are the limited number of possible usable combinations, which make code guessing a practical option for bypass. Most of the electronic (access control) pushbutton locks are capable of overcoming many of the limitations found in the mechanical keyless locksets. While you can remove a Simplex 1000 unit and retrofit a new electronic lockset onto the same door, there is a more economical option now available.

Lock Before

Lock Before

 

Lock after

Lock after

Nigel Rose Marketing services of High Wycombe now sells an electronic module to convert the

The brains of the Lock

The brains of the Lock

Mechanical push-button operation of the Simplex 1000 to the capabilities of electronic access control. In order to make the lock conversion, you only need to remove the mechanical combination chamber and replace it with their new electronic module. The cost savings in both material and labour are substantial. Converting the Simplex 1000 The electronic module is made by Smartlock Systems is called the RetroFit 1000. It is an electronic combination chamber designed to replace the mechanical combination chamber that comes standard inside the 1000 lockcase. Converting the chamber has no effect on lock installation only the operation of the lock. I.e. no additional carpentry to do, it fits back where it came from The first step to converting the Simplex 1000 is to remove the lockset from the door, simply follow the instructions, program and refit to the door. Contact Nigel rose 01494 438118 don’t forget to mention LASM Article Originally published in the LASM paper publication in April 2010

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